A Final Broadside

Author: Buddy Worrell
Publisher: Abbott Press
ISBN: 9781458220950
Size: 16.31 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 95

It is December 1941 and just as his naval officer father and over one thousand sailors and officers are killed on the USS Arizona in Pearl Harbor, Ken Hager enters the world. After the attack, little Ken and his newly-widowed mother return to their home in the North Carolina mountains to begin a new chapter. As Ken matures into a young man, he soon realizes that he has special paranormal gifts. While his abilities grow stronger, more powerful events unfold that lead Ken to recognize a destiny that will eventually lead him back to the USS Arizona, its perished but rather loud crew, and a secret mission revealed by his deceased father. As Ken’s destiny collides with that of a Cambodian international criminal and a plot to unleash a weapon of mass destruction on the United States, he is guided to the USS North Carolina battleship memorial where everything changes once again with help from a ghostly crew. In this military thriller, an American born during the Pearl Harbor attack must rely on his supernatural gifts years later in a courageous attempt to stop an evil international plot.

Wrestling With The Muse

Author: Melba Joyce Boyd
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 9780231503648
Size: 17.50 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 46

And as I groped in darkness and felt the pain of millions, gradually, like day driving night across the continent, I saw dawn upon them like the sun a vision. —Dudley Randall, from "Roses and Revolutions" In 1963, the African American poet Dudley Randall (1914–2000) wrote "The Ballad of Birmingham" in response to the bombing of a church in Alabama that killed four young black girls, and "Dressed All in Pink," about the assassination of President Kennedy. When both were set to music by folk singer Jerry Moore in 1965, Randall published them as broadsides. Thus was born the Broadside Press, whose popular chapbooks opened the canon of American literature to the works of African American writers. Dudley Randall, one of the great success stories of American small-press history, was also poet laureate of Detroit, a civil-rights activist, and a force in the Black Arts Movement. Melba Joyce Boyd was an editor at Broadside, was Randall’s friend and colleague for twenty-eight years, and became his authorized biographer. Her book is an account of the interconnections between urban and labor politics in Detroit and the broader struggles of black America before and during the Civil Rights era. But also, through Randall’s poetry and sixteen years of interviews, the narrative is a multipart dialogue between poets, Randall, the author, and the history of American letters itself, and it affords unique insights into the life and work of this crucial figure.

The Strange Career Of Jim Crow

Author: The late C. Vann Woodward
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199840237
Size: 15.85 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 63

C. Vann Woodward, who died in 1999 at the age of 91, was America's most eminent Southern historian, the winner of a Pulitzer Prize for Mary Chestnut's Civil War and a Bancroft Prize for The Origins of the New South. Now, to honor his long and truly distinguished career, Oxford is pleased to publish this special commemorative edition of Woodward's most influential work, The Strange Career of Jim Crow. The Strange Career of Jim Crow is one of the great works of Southern history. Indeed, the book actually helped shape that history. Published in 1955, a year after the Supreme Court in Brown v. Board of Education ordered schools desegregated, Strange Career was cited so often to counter arguments for segregation that Martin Luther King, Jr. called it "the historical Bible of the civil rights movement." The book offers a clear and illuminating analysis of the history of Jim Crow laws, presenting evidence that segregation in the South dated only to the 1890s. Woodward convincingly shows that, even under slavery, the two races had not been divided as they were under the Jim Crow laws of the 1890s. In fact, during Reconstruction, there was considerable economic and political mixing of the races. The segregating of the races was a relative newcomer to the region. Hailed as one of the top 100 nonfiction works of the twentieth century, The Strange Career of Jim Crow has sold almost a million copies and remains, in the words of David Herbert Donald, "a landmark in the history of American race relations."