Acid Dreams

Author: Martin A. Lee
Publisher: Grove/Atlantic, Inc.
ISBN: 0802196063
Size: 20.79 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 52

Few events have had a more profound impact on the social and cultural upheavals of the Sixties than the psychedelic revolution spawned by the spread of LSD. This book for the first time tells the full and astounding story—part of it hidden till now in secret Government files—of the role the mind-altering drug played in our recent turbulent history and the continuing influence it has on our time. And what a story it is, beginning with LSD’s discovery in 1943 as the most potent drug known to science until it spilled into public view some twenty years later to set the stage for one of the great ideological wars of the decade. In the intervening years the CIA had launched a massive covert research program in the hope that LSD would serve as an espionage weapon, psychiatric pioneers came to believe that acid would shed light on the perplexing problems of mental illness, and a new generation of writers and artists had given birth to the LSD sub-culture. Acid Dreams is a complete social history of the psychedelic counter-culture that burst into full view in the Sixties. With new information obtained through the Freedom of Information Act, the authors reveal how the CIA became obsessed with LSD during the Cold War, fearing the Soviets had designs on it as well. What follows is one of the more bizarre episodes in the covert history of U.S. intelligence as the search for a “truth drug” began to resemble a James Bond scenario in which agents spied on drug-addicted prostitutes through two-way mirrors and countless unwitting citizens received acid with sometimes tragic results. The story took a new turn when Captain Al Hubbard, the first of a series of “Johnny Appleseeds” of acid, began to turn on thousands of scientists, businessmen, church figures, policemen, and others from different walks of life. Timothy Leary, Ken Kesey and his band of Merry Pranksters, Allen Ginsberg and the Beat generation, the Diggers and the Age of Golden Anarchy in Haight-Ashbury, William Mellon Hitchcock, Abbie Hoffman and the Yippies, the Beatles—these are just some of a motley cast of characters who stride through the pages of this compelling chronicle. What impact did the widespread use of LSD have on the anti-war movement of the late Sixties? Acid Dreams traces the way the drug intensified each stage of counter-cultural transition to break the “mind-forged manacles” of a new generation in rebellion. In Acid Dreams, Martin Lee and Bruce Shalin have written the history of a time still only dimly understood. The events they recount and the facts they uncover supply an important missing piece of the puzzle of a crucial decade in our recent past. Praise “Engaging throughout. . . . At once entertaining and disturbing.”—Andrew Weil, M.D., The Nation “Marvelously detailed . . . loaded with startling revelations.”—Los Angeles Daily News “Excellent. . . . Captivating. . . . A generalist’s history that should replace all others.”—San Francisco Chronicle “A landmark contribution to the sociopolitical history of the U.S. . . . Some of the liveliest, most absorbing, best-documented historical analyses to appear in recent years. . . . A seminal contribution to understanding America’s most turbulent modern decade.”—Choice “This funny and irreverent book brings it all back.”—The Washington Post “Recounts some of the most bizarre incidents in the history of U.S. intelligence.”—The Boston Globe “A monumental social history of psychedelia.”—The Village Voice “A blistering exposé of CIA drug experimentation on Americans. It’s all there.”—John Stockwell “Highly readable. . . . Well researched. . . . Filled with entertaining and bizarre episodes.”—The Detroit Free Press “An important study of cultural history. . . . The scholarship is exquisite and the methods sensible.”—Allen Ginsberg “An engrossing account of a period . . . when a tiny psychoactive molecule affected almost every aspect of Western life.”—William S. Burroughs “A missing link, a work of combat history, a devastating combination of facts and poetry that is bound to arouse controversy.”—Paul Krassner “An important historical synthesis of the spread and effects of a drug that served as a central metaphor for an era.”—John Sayles

Acid Dreams

Author: Martin A. Lee
Publisher: Grove Press
ISBN: 0802130623
Size: 16.49 MB
Format: PDF
View: 52

Provides a social history of how the CIA used the psychedelic drug LSD as a tool of espionage during the early 1950s and tested it on U.S. citizens before it spread into popular culture, in particular the counterculture as represented by Timothy Leary, Allen Ginsberg, Ken Kesey, and others who helped spawn political and social upheaval.

Acid Dreams

Author: Martin A. Lee
Publisher:
ISBN: UOM:39015043798464
Size: 19.70 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 15

Acid Dreams is the complete social history of LSD and the counterculture it helped to define in the sixties. Martin Lee and Bruce Shlain's exhaustively researched and astonishing account -- part of it gleaned from secret government files -- tells how the CIA became obsessed with LSD as an espionage weapon during the early 1950s and launched a massive covert research program, in which countless unwitting citizens were used as guinea pigs. Though the CIA was intent on keeping the drug to itself, it ultimately couldn't prevent it from spreading into the popular culture; here LSD had a profound impact and helped spawn a political and social upheaval that changed the face of America. From the clandestine operations of the government to the escapades of Timothy Leary, Abbie Hoffman, Ken Kesey and his Merry Pranksters, Allen Ginsberg, and many others, Acid Dreams provides an important and entertaining account that goes to the heart of a turbulent period in our history. Book jacket.

Storming Heaven

Author: Jay Stevens
Publisher: BookBaby
ISBN: 9781617925559
Size: 13.27 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 91

Steeped in research, but reading like a fast-paced novel, Stevens' story begins with pioneering psychologists discovering the effects on the mind of mescaline and psilocybin, the role of the CIA in testing mind-control drugs, the evolution of Timothy Leary from Harvard research psychologist to the most "dangerous man in America", the wrenching changes from the repressed 50's to the upheavals of the 60s, and along the way giving us portraits of some of the most colorful characters in modern American history, including Allen Ginsberg, Ken Kesey, Aldous Huxley, and Jack Kerouac.

The Acid Diaries

Author: Christopher Gray
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 9781594778889
Size: 12.28 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 32

An exploration of the personal and spiritual truths revealed through LSD • Reveals that LSD visions weave an ongoing story from trip to trip • Shows that trips progress through three stages: personal issues and pre-birth consciousness, ego-loss, and on to the sacred • Explores psychedelic use throughout history, including the mass hallucinations common in the Middle Ages and the early therapeutic use of LSD Toward the end of his fifties, Christopher Gray took, for the first time in years, a 100-microgram acid trip. So extraordinary, and to his surprise so enjoyable, were the effects that he began to take the same dose in the same way--quietly and on his own--once every two to three weeks. In The Acid Diaries, Gray details his experimentation with LSD over a period of three years and shares the startling realization that his visions were weaving an ongoing story from trip to trip, revealing an underlying reality of personal and spiritual truths. Following the theories of Stanislav Grof and offering quotes from others’ experiences that parallel his own--including those of Aldous Huxley, Albert Hofmann, and Gordon Wasson--he shows that trips progress through three stages: the first dealing with personal issues and pre-birth consciousness; the second with ego-loss, often with supernatural overtones; and the third with sacred, spiritual, and even apocalyptic themes. Pairing his experiences with an exploration of psychedelic use throughout history, including the ergot-spawned mass hallucinations that were common through the Middle Ages and the early use of LSD for therapeutic purposes, Gray offers readers a greater understanding and appreciation for the potential value of LSD not merely for transpersonal growth but also for spiritual development.

Smoke Signals

Author: Martin A. Lee
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 9781439102619
Size: 14.75 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 51

The best-selling co-author of Acid Dream traces the dramatic social history of marijuana from its origins and its emergence in the 1960s culture wars through the 1996 legalization of medicinal marijuana in California, profiling the multibillion-dollar marijuana industry and how it is reshaping health care. 35,000 first printing.

Thrown Among Strangers

Author: Douglas Monroy
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520082755
Size: 20.67 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 95

Every California schoolchild's first interaction with history begins with the missions and Indians. It is the pastoralist image, of course, and it is a lasting one. Children in elementary school hear how Father Serra and the priests brought civilization to the groveling, lizard- and acorn-eating Indians of such communities as Yang-na, now Los Angeles. So edified by history, many of those children drag their parents to as many missions as they can. Then there is the other side of the missions, one that a mural decorating a savings and loan office in the San Fernando Valley first showed to me as a child. On it a kindly priest holds a large cross over a kneeling Indian. For some reason, though, the padre apparently aims not to bless the Indian but rather to bludgeon him with the emblem of Christianity. This portrait, too, clings to the memory, capturing the critical view of the missionization of California's indigenous inhabitants. I carried the two childhood images with me both when I went to libraries as I researched the missions and when I revisited several missions thirty years after those family trips. In this work I proceed neither to dubunk nor to reconcile these contrary notions of the missions and Indians but to present a new and, I hope, deeper understanding of the complex interaction of the two antithetical cultures.