Constitutionalism And The Separation Of Powers

Author: M. J. C. Vile
Publisher:
ISBN: 0865971757
Size: 18.63 MB
Format: PDF
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Vile traces the history of the doctrine from its rise during the English Civil War, through its development in the eighteenth century -- through subsequent political thought and constitution-making in Britain, France, and the United States.

Separation Of Powers In African Constitutionalism

Author: Charles M. Fombad
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780191077913
Size: 19.55 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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The new series Stellenbosch Handbooks in African Constitutional Law will engage with contemporary issues of constitutionalism in Africa, filling a notable gap in African comparative constitutional law. Separation of Powers in African Constitutionalism is the first in the series, examining one of the critical measures introduced by African constitutional designers in their attempts to entrench an ethos of constitutionalism on the continent. Taking a critical look at the different ways in which attempts have been made to separate the different branches of government, the Handbook examines the impact this is having on transparent and accountable governance. Beginning with an overview of constitutionalism in Africa and the different influences on modern African constitutional developments, it looks at the relationship between the legislature and the executive as well as the relationship between the judiciary and the political branches. Despite differences in approaches between the different constitutional cultures that have influenced developments in Africa, there remain common problems. One of these problems is the constant friction in the relationship between the three branches and the resurgent threats of authoritarianism which clearly suggest that there remain serious problems in both constitutional design and implementation. The book also studies the increasing role being played by independent constitutional institutions and how they complement the checks and balances associated with the traditional three branches of government.

Constitutionalism Human Rights Separation Of Powers

Author: G. M. Pikis
Publisher: Martinus Nijhoff Publishers
ISBN: 9789004152410
Size: 13.76 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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The Constitution incorporates human rights as a dominant feature of its order pervading every aspect of the law and has been the sole source of authority, with the Judiciary cast as a watchdog trusted to ensure that no branch of the State transgresses the boundaries of its powers. The book chronicles through the case law of the Supreme Court, a precedent of constitutionalism worthy of the attention of every scholar of constitutional law.

The New Separation Of Powers

Author: Eoin Carolan
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 9780199568673
Size: 12.98 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This book offers a radical and provocative revision of the theory of separation of powers. It argues that, although designed to protect democracy, separation of powers is often used today to undermine it by concealing and centralising the exercise of power by public officials. The theory is then reinvented for the modern regulatory state.

The Power Of Separation

Author: Jessica Korn
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 0691058563
Size: 13.71 MB
Format: PDF
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Author Jessica Korn challenges the notion that the 18th-century principles underlying the American separation of powers system are incompatible with the demands of 20th-century governance by questioning the dominant scholarship on the legislative veto. Korn's analysis shows that commentators have exaggerated the legislative veto's significance as a result of their incorrect assumption that the separation of powers was designed solely to check governmental authority.

The Three Branches

Author: Christoph Möllers
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199602117
Size: 12.32 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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The idea of the separation of powers is still popular in much political and constitutional discourse, though its meaning for the modern state remains unclear and contested. This book develops a new, comprehensive, and systematic account of the principle. It then applies this new concept to legal problems of different national constitutional orders, the law of the European Union, and international institutional law. It connects an argument from normative political theory with phenomena taken from comparative constitutional law. The book argues that the conflict between individual liberty and democratic self-determination that is characteristic of modern constitutionalism is proceduralized through the establishment of different governmental branches. A close analysis of the relation between individual and collective autonomy on the one hand and the ways lawmaking through public institutions can be established on the other hand helps us identify criteria for determining how legislative, administrative, and judicial lawmaking can be distinguished and should be organized. These criteria define a common ground in the confusing variety of western constitutional traditions and their diverse use of the notion of separated powers. They also enable us to establish a normative framework that throws a fresh perspective on problems of constitutional law in different constitutional systems: constitutional judicial review of legislation, limits of legislative delegation, parliamentary control of the executive, and standing. Linking arguments from comparative constitutional law and international law, the book then uses this framework to offer a new perspective on the debate on constitutionalism beyond the state. The concept permits certain institutional insights of the constitutional experiences within states to be applied at the international level without falling into any form of methodological nationalism.