Hobbies Annual

Author: Ammonite Press
Publisher:
ISBN: 1906672202
Size: 17.55 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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From 1895, 'Hobbies Weekly' brought much-needed practical advice and inspiration to bespectacled boys in V-neck pullovers, young ladies in sensible shoes and their pipe-smoking parents (of both sexes) throughout the Empire. Fretwork plans, model-making instructions and photography tuition rubbed shoulders with home-made insect repellent, conjuring tricks, milk bottle care, simple refrigeration and seamanship. We especially commend the series 'Kinks For Handy Men'. In a book of carefully-selected extracts from this august journal, The Ammonite Press is proud to reintroduce these solid values at a time when society couldn't be in greater need of guidance in such useful skills as ornamental glass-working at home and the production of bewildered rabbits from hats. How many young people these days can construct a carrier wave transmitter at the dining table? How much more satisfying would be the work of David Hockney had he made his own easel, palette and oil paints? This book is bound to appeal to any young person in need of a phenakistoscope, those women whose home is without a boot-cleaning stool and all men who wish to benefit from the advice given in a 1950s series of articles entitled: 'Please The Wife'.

Hewett Cottrell Watson

Author: Frank N. Egerton
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781317243816
Size: 18.74 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 86

First published in 2003. Hewett Cottrell Watson was a pioneer in a new science not yet defined in Victorian times – ecology – and was practically the first naturalist to conduct research on plant evolution, beginning in 1834. The correspondence between Watson and Darwin, analysed for the first time in this book, reveals the extent to which Darwin profited from Watson’s data. Darwin’s subsequent fame, however, is one of the reasons why Watson became almost forgotten. This biography traces both the influences and characteristics that shaped Watson’s outlook and personality, and indeed his science, and the institutional contexts within which he worked. At the same time, it makes evident the extent of his real contributions to the science of the plant ecology and evolution.