Laboring Women

Author: Jennifer L. Morgan
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 9780812206371
Size: 11.74 MB
Format: PDF
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When black women were brought from Africa to the New World as slave laborers, their value was determined by their ability to work as well as their potential to bear children, who by law would become the enslaved property of the mother's master. In Laboring Women: Reproduction and Gender in New World Slavery, Jennifer L. Morgan examines for the first time how African women's labor in both senses became intertwined in the English colonies. Beginning with the ideological foundations of racial slavery in early modern Europe, Laboring Women traverses the Atlantic, exploring the social and cultural lives of women in West Africa, slaveowners' expectations for reproductive labor, and women's lives as workers and mothers under colonial slavery. Challenging conventional wisdom, Morgan reveals how expectations regarding gender and reproduction were central to racial ideologies, the organization of slave labor, and the nature of slave community and resistance. Taking into consideration the heritage of Africans prior to enslavement and the cultural logic of values and practices recreated under the duress of slavery, she examines how women's gender identity was defined by their shared experiences as agricultural laborers and mothers, and shows how, given these distinctions, their situation differed considerably from that of enslaved men. Telling her story through the arc of African women's actual lives—from West Africa, to the experience of the Middle Passage, to life on the plantations—she offers a thoughtful look at the ways women's reproductive experience shaped their roles in communities and helped them resist some of the more egregious effects of slave life. Presenting a highly original, theoretically grounded view of reproduction and labor as the twin pillars of female exploitation in slavery, Laboring Women is a distinctive contribution to the literature of slavery and the history of women.

Women In Early America

Author: Thomas A. Foster
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 9781479874545
Size: 20.66 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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Women in Early America, edited by Thomas A. Foster, tells the fascinating stories of the myriad women who shaped the early modern North American world from the colonial era through the first years of the Republic. This volume goes beyond the familiar stories of Pocahontas or Abigail Adams, recovering the lives and experiences of lesser-known women—both ordinary and elite, enslaved and free, Indigenous and immigrant—who lived and worked in not only British mainland America, but also New Spain, New France, New Netherlands, and the West Indies. In these essays we learn about the conditions that women faced during the Salem witchcraft panic and the Spanish Inquisition in New Mexico; as indentured servants in early Virginia and Maryland; caught up between warring British and Native Americans; as traders in New Netherlands and Detroit; as slave owners in Jamaica; as Loyalist women during the American Revolution; enslaved in the President’s house; and as students and educators inspired by the air of equality in the young nation. Foster showcases the latest research of junior and senior historians, drawing from recent scholarship informed by women’s and gender history—feminist theory, gender theory, new cultural history, social history, and literary criticism. Collectively, these essays address the need for scholarship on women’s lives and experiences. Women in Early America heeds the call of feminist scholars to not merely reproduce male-centered narratives, “add women, and stir,” but to rethink master narratives themselves so that we may better understand how women and men created and developed our historical past. Instructor's Guide

Women And Slavery In America

Author: Catherine M. Lewis
Publisher: University of Arkansas Press
ISBN: 9781610754774
Size: 19.42 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Women and Slavery offers readers an opportunity to examine the establishment, growth, and evolution of slavery in the United States as it impacted women-enslaved and free, African American and white, wealthy and poor, northern and southern. The primary documents-including newspaper articles, broadsides, cartoons, pamphlets, speeches, photographs, memoirs, and editorials-are organized thematically and represent cultural, political, religious, economic, and social perspectives on this dark and complex period in American history.

Free At Last Reflections On Freedom And The Abolition Of The British Transatlantic Slave Trade

Author: Cecily Jones
Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing
ISBN: 9781443831130
Size: 15.52 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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The global commemorative events of 2007 that marked the bicentennial anniversary of the parliamentary abolition of the African slave trade provided opportunity for widespread discussion between politicians, community groups, museums and heritage organisations, the clergy, and scholars, as to the meanings of colonial and post-colonial freedom. As was evident from the tensions emerging from those debates, the subject of the transatlantic slave trade and slavery remains highly charged, as does the extent to which its legacy of racism, predicated on theoretical assumptions of European cultural, social, political and economic superiority, continues to maintain and reproduce complex systems of inequalities between peoples and societies. Free at Last? is an edited collection of interdisciplinary perspectives that critically reflects on the struggles of enslaved peoples and anti-slavery activists to effect the abolition of the British slave trade, as well as the post-abolition global legacies of those diverse struggles for equality. The chapters bring together multiple narratives and discourses about the British abolition to reflect critically and comparatively on: the boundaries between slavery and freedom; the contestations and championing of freedom; and the legacies of slavery and abolition in the contemporary context.

Revolutionary Conceptions

Author: Susan E. Klepp
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 9780807838716
Size: 16.12 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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In the Age of Revolution, how did American women conceive their lives and marital obligations? By examining the attitudes and behaviors surrounding the contentious issues of family, contraception, abortion, sexuality, beauty, and identity, Susan E. Klepp demonstrates that many women--rural and urban, free and enslaved--began to radically redefine motherhood. They asserted, or attempted to assert, control over their bodies, their marriages, and their daughters' opportunities. Late-eighteenth-century American women were among the first in the world to disavow the continual childbearing and large families that had long been considered ideal. Liberty, equality, and heartfelt religion led to new conceptions of virtuous, rational womanhood and responsible parenthood. These changes can be seen in falling birthrates, in advice to friends and kin, in portraits, and in a gradual, even reluctant, shift in men's opinions. Revolutionary-era women redefined femininity, fertility, family, and their futures by limiting births. Women might not have won the vote in the new Republic, they might not have gained formal rights in other spheres, but, Klepp argues, there was a women's revolution nonetheless.

Spacetime Of The Imperial

Author: Holt Meyer
Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG
ISBN: 9783110418859
Size: 14.92 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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In diesem Band geht es um Raumzeit-Konzepte imperialer Herrschaftspraktiken von der Antike bis zur Gegenwart und ihre Repräsentationen in verschiedensten Medien. International renommierte Wissenschaftler beleuchten das Thema aus historiographischer, kartographischer, religionswissenschaftlicher, literatur- bzw. medien-wissenschaftlicher sowie ethnographischer Perspektive.

Sex Among The Rabble

Author: Clare A. Lyons
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 9780807838969
Size: 11.34 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Placing sexual culture at the center of power relations in Revolutionary-era Philadelphia, Clare A. Lyons uncovers a world where runaway wives challenged their husbands' patriarchal rights and where serial and casual sexual relationships were commonplace. By reading popular representations of sex against actual behavior, Lyons reveals the clash of meanings given to sex and illuminates struggles to recast sexuality in order to eliminate its subversive potential. Sexuality became the vehicle for exploring currents of liberty, freedom, and individualism in the politics of everyday life among groups of early Americans typically excluded from formal systems of governance--women, African Americans, and poor classes of whites. Lyons shows that men and women created a vibrant urban pleasure culture, including the eroticization of print culture, as eighteenth-century readers became fascinated with stories of bastardy, prostitution, seduction, and adultery. In the post-Revolutionary reaction, white middle-class men asserted their authority, Lyons argues, by creating a gender system that simultaneously allowed them the liberty of their passions, constrained middle-class women with virtue, and projected licentiousness onto lower-class whites and African Americans. Lyons's analysis shows how class and racial divisions fostered new constructions of sexuality that served as a foundation for gender. This gendering of sexuality in the new nation was integral to reconstituting social hierarchies and subordinating women and African Americans in the wake of the Revolution.