Medieval Mississippians

Author: Timothy R. Pauketat
Publisher: School for Advanced Research on the
ISBN: 1938645316
Size: 17.53 MB
Format: PDF
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This title introduces a key historical period in pre-Columbian eastern North America - the 'Mississippian' era - via a series of colourful essays on places, practices, and peoples written from Native American and non-Native perspectives on the past. The volume lays out the basic contours of the early centuries of this era (AD 1000-1300) in the Mississippian heartland, making connections to later centuries and contemporary peoples.

Ancient America

Author: Kenneth L. Feder
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9781442263130
Size: 12.78 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Presenting “the real deal” of American antiquity—as opposed to the hyped fare of many cable TV shows—Kenneth Feder invites readers to explore the stunning technological, architectural, engineering, and artistic achievements of America’s first peoples. Part travel guide, part friendly reference, Ancient America showcases fifty iconic and publicly-accessible sites located across the contiguous United States—including monumental pyramids of earth, “castles” ensconced in cliff niches, and vast rock art galleries. Among the places profiled are four World Heritage Sites (Chaco Canyon, NM; Mesa Verde, CO; Cahokia, IL; Poverty Point, LA); numerous Historic Landmarks and National Monuments (including Crystal River, FL; Town Creek Mound, NC; Casa Grande, AZ; and Hovenweep, UT); and stunningly diverse sites ranging from Serpent Mound (OH) and Horsethief Lake (WA) to Canyon de Chelly (AZ) and Nine Mile Canyon (UT). In addition to practical visitor information, Feder tells the fascinating stories of each site as revealed by archaeological research. Introductory chapters delve into the deep past of Native America; historical and cultural details as well as original photography round out the site entries. Readers will be inspired to visit these remarkable places where the past continues to resonate in the present.

Religion And Innovation

Author: Donald A. Yerxa
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 9781472591029
Size: 19.56 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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It is often assumed that religion is the backward-looking servant of tradition and the status quo, utterly opposed to the new. This refrain in so much of recent polemical writing has permeated the public mind and can even be found in academic publications. But recent scholarship increasingly shows that this view is a gross simplification - that, in fact, religious beliefs and practices have contributed to significant changes in human affairs: political and legal, social and artistic, scientific and commercial. This is certainly not to say that religion is always innovative. But the relationship between religion and innovation is much more complex and instructive than is generally assumed. Religion and Innovation includes contributions from leading historians, archaeologists, and social scientists, who offer findings about the relationship between religion and innovation. The essays collected in this volume range from discussions of the transformative power of religion in early societies; to re-examinations of our notions of naturalism, secularization, and progress; to explorations of cutting-edge contemporary issues. Combining scholarly rigor with clear, accessible writing, Religion and Innovation: Antagonists or Partners? is essential reading for anyone interested in the history of religion and the ongoing debates about its role in the modern world and into the future.

Cahokia

Author: Timothy R. Pauketat
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 0803287658
Size: 15.45 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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About one thousand years ago, Native Americans built hundreds of earthen platform mounds, plazas, residential areas, and other types of monuments in the vicinity of present-day St. Louis. This sprawling complex, known to archaeologists as Cahokia, was the dominant cultural, ceremonial, and trade center north of Mexico for centuries. This stimulating collection of essays casts new light on the remarkable accomplishments of Cahokia.

In Search Of Chaco

Author: David Grant Noble
Publisher: School for Advanced Research on the
ISBN: STANFORD:36105114266559
Size: 17.79 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Startling discoveries and impassioned debates have emerged from the "Chaco Phenomenon" since the publication of New Light on Chaco Canyon twenty years ago. This completely updated edition features seventeen original essays, scores of photographs, maps, and site plans, and the perspectives of archaeologists, historians, and Native American thinkers. Key topics include the rise of early great houses; the structure of agricultural life among the people of Chaco Canyon; their use of sacred geography and astronomy in organizing their spiritual cosmology; indigenous knowledge about Chaco from the perspective of Hopi, Tewa, and Navajo peoples; and the place of Chaco in the wider world of archaeology.For more than a century archaeologists and others have pursued Chaco Canyon's many and elusive meanings. In Search of Chaco brings these explorations to a new generation of enthusiasts.

History Of American Indians Exploring Diverse Roots

Author: Robert R. McCoy
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 9780313386831
Size: 16.16 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 69

A comprehensive look at the entirety of Native American history, focusing particularly on native peoples within the geographic boundaries of the United States. • Provides readers with a synopsis of the most current findings on the prehistory of American Indians • Creates a comprehensive narrative of American Indian history • Presents extensive coverage of the history of the American West and Pacific Northwest • Addresses topics that are often overlooked in other narratives, such as the American Indian's role in the Civil War • Covers contemporary American Indian life and culture