Mormon Feminism

Author: Joanna Brooks
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780190248055
Size: 18.33 MB
Format: PDF
View: 78

This groundbreaking collection gathers together for the first time the essential writings of the contemporary Mormon feminist movement--from its historic beginnings in the 1970s to its vibrant present, offering the best Mormon feminist thought and writing. No issue in Mormonism has made more headlines than the faith's distinctive approach to sex and gender. From its polygamous nineteenth-century past to its twentieth-century stand against the Equal Rights Amendment and its twenty-first-century fight against same-sex marriage, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS) has consistently positioned itself on the frontlines of battles over gender-related identities, roles, and rights. But even as the church has maintained a conservative position in public debates over sex and gender, Mormon women have developed their own brand of feminism by recovering the lost histories of female leadership and exploring the empowering potential of Mormon theology. The selections in this book-many gathered from out-of-print anthologies, magazines, and other ephemera--walk the reader through the history of Mormon feminism, from the second-wave feminism of the 1970s to contemporary debates over the ordination of women. Collecting essays, speeches, poems, and prose, Mormon Feminism presents the diverse voices of Mormon women as they challenge assumptions and stereotypes, push for progress and change in the contemporary LDS Church, and band together with other feminists of faith hoping to build a better world.

Mormon Feminism

Author: Joanna Brooks
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780190248048
Size: 18.78 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 43

This groundbreaking collection gathers together for the first time the essential writings of the contemporary Mormon feminist movement--from its historic beginnings in the 1970s to its vibrant present, offering the best Mormon feminist thought and writing. No issue in Mormonism has made more headlines than the faith's distinctive approach to sex and gender. From its polygamous nineteenth-century past to its twentieth-century stand against the Equal Rights Amendment and its twenty-first-century fight against same-sex marriage, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS) has consistently positioned itself on the frontlines of battles over gender-related identities, roles, and rights. But even as the church has maintained a conservative position in public debates over sex and gender, Mormon women have developed their own brand of feminism by recovering the lost histories of female leadership and exploring the empowering potential of Mormon theology. The selections in this book-many gathered from out-of-print anthologies, magazines, and other ephemera--walk the reader through the history of Mormon feminism, from the second-wave feminism of the 1970s to contemporary debates over the ordination of women. Collecting essays, speeches, poems, and prose, Mormon Feminism presents the diverse voices of Mormon women as they challenge assumptions and stereotypes, push for progress and change in the contemporary LDS Church, and band together with other feminists of faith hoping to build a better world.

Mormon Feminism

Author: Rachel Hunt Steenblik
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780190248031
Size: 10.47 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 76

This collection gathers together the essential writings of the contemporary Mormon feminist movement--from its historic beginnings in the 1970s to its vibrant present, offering the best Mormon feminist thought and writing. The selections in this book -many gathered from out-of-print anthologies, magazines, and other ephemera--walk the reader through the history of Mormon feminism, from the second-wave feminism of the 1970s to contemporary debates over the ordination of women. Collecting essays, speeches, poems, and prose, Mormon Feminism presents the diverse voices of Mormon women as they challenge assumptions and stereotypes, push for progress and change in the contemporary LDS Church, and band together with other feminists of faith hoping to build a better world.

The Book Of Mormon Girl

Author: Joanna Brooks
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 9781451699685
Size: 12.19 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 77

Story about leaving behind the innocence of childhood belief and embracing the complications and heartbreaks that come to every adult life of faith. Explores the author's journey through her faith, and the experience of being a Mormon.

Voices For Equality Ordain Women And Resurgent Mormon Feminism

Author: Gary Shepherd
Publisher:
ISBN: 1589587588
Size: 16.54 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 11

The inexorable movement toward gender equality in the modern world has taken root in the consciousness of many Latter-day Saints and has publicly emerged as a major concern for the LDS Church. Spearheaded by a new generation of internet-savvy feminists, equality issues in Mormonism attained high public visibility in 2013 through online profiles posted by the Ordain Women organization and its plea to Church authorities to pray about an expanded role for LDS women. The June 2014 excommunication of OW co-founder Kate Kelly generated increased international media attention. This volume is the first book to provide a comprehensive examination of these issues and is based on chapters written by both scholars and activists. Its twenty-five authors explore in detail theological debates about gender and priesthood authority, the historical and cultural context of these debates, and the current role played by lay activists seeking to stimulate change in the Church.

Faithful History

Author: George Dempster Smith
Publisher:
ISBN: WISC:89067401562
Size: 11.62 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 48

Over the past decade, Mormon history has undergone a transformation as LDS scholars have debated how their church's story should be written. New Mormon Historians distinguish between what they believe is verifiable and what they suspect may be folklore, and they approach history from a variety of different academic and social perspectives. Mormonism has also become of interest to non-LDS scholars. This raises the question of whether outsiders can truly understand Mormons, and conversely whether insiders can achieve enough detachment to see themselves objectively, or whether this is even desirable. Does history have an inherent meaning beyond the scholar's particular viewpoint, and should a writer strive to understand another person's perspective, or is one's own subjective vantage all that is possible and ultimately what is important? The new Mormon traditionalists contend that objectivity is, in fact, impossible and that history is written with certain pre-understandings; also, that some viewpoints are superior based on spiritual insight, including a belief in God and in Joseph Smith as the prophet, and that one should not impassively report examples of faith but should actively promote them. In this compilation, the editor has assembled sixteen essays which represent all sides of this ongoing discussion.

Pedestals And Podiums

Author: Martha Sonntag Bradley
Publisher:
ISBN: STANFORD:36105123367851
Size: 14.55 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 18

Almost from the beginning, the women's movement has been divided into two factions–those wanting full equality with men (Susan B. Anthony, Alice Paul) and those seeking legal protections for women's particular needs (Julia Ward Howe, Eleanor Roosevelt). Early Utah leaders such as Relief Society President Emmeline B. Wells walked hand-in-hand with Anthony and other controversial reformers. However, by the 1970s, Mormons had undergone a significant ideological turn to the mainstream, championing women's unique roles in home and church, and joined other conservatives in defeating the Equal Rights Amendment. Looking back to the nineteenth century, how committed were Latter-day Saints of their day to women's rights? LDS President Joseph F. Smith was particularly critical of women who “glory in their enthralled condition and who caress and fondle the very chains and manacles which fetter and enslave them!” The masthead of the church's female Relief Society periodical, Woman's Exponent, proudly proclaimed “The Rights of the Women of Zion and the Rights of Women of All Nations!” In leading the LDS sisterhood, Wells said she gleaned inspiration from The Revolution,published by Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Fast-forward a century to 1972 and passage of the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) by the United States Congress. Within a few years, the LDS Church, allied with Phyllis Schlafly, joined a coalition of the Religious Right and embarked on a campaign against ratification. This was a mostly grassroots campaign waged by thousands of men and women who believed they were engaged in a moral war and that the enemy was feminism itself. Conjuring up images of unisex bathrooms, homosexuality, the dangers of women in the military, and the divine calling of stay-at-home motherhood—none of which were directly related to equal rights—the LDS campaign began in Utah at church headquarters but importantly was fought across the country in states that had not yet ratified the proposed amendment. In contrast to the enthusiastic partnership of Mormon women and suffragists of an earlier era, fourteen thousand women, the majority of them obedient, determined LDS foot soldiers responding to a call from their Relief Society leaders, attended the 1977 Utah International Women's Year Conference in Salt Lake City. Their intent was to commandeer the proceedings if necessary to defeat the pro-ERA agenda of the National Commission on the International Women's Year. Ironically, the conference organizers were mostly LDS women, who were nevertheless branded by their sisters as feminists. In practice, the church risked much by standing up political action committees around the country and waging a seemingly all-or-nothing campaign. Its strategists, beginning with the dean of the church's law school at BYU, feared the worst—some going so far as to suggest that the ERA might seriously compromise the church's legal status and sovereignty of its all-male priesthood. In the wake of such horrors, a take-no-prisoners war of rhetoric and leafleteering raged across the country. In the end, the church exerted a significant, perhaps decisive, impact on the ERA''s unexpected defeat.