Poetic Relations

Author: Constance M. Furey
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226434292
Size: 13.70 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 34

What is the relationship between our isolated and our social selves, between aloneness and interconnection? Constance M. Furey probes this question through a suggestive literary tradition: early Protestant poems in which a single speaker describes a solitary search for God. As Furey demonstrates, John Donne, George Herbert, Anne Bradstreet, and others describe inner lives that are surprisingly crowded, teeming with human as well as divine companions. The same early modern writers who bequeathed to us the modern distinction between self and society reveal here a different way of thinking about selfhood altogether. For them, she argues, the self is neither alone nor universally connected, but is forever interactive and dynamically constituted by specific relationships. By means of an analysis equally attentive to theological ideas, social conventions, and poetic form, Furey reveals how poets who understand introspection as a relational act, and poetry itself as a form ideally suited to crafting a relational self, offer us new ways of thinking about selfhood today—and a resource for reimagining both secular and religious ways of being in the world.

Something We Have That They Don T

Author: Steven H. Clark
Publisher: University of Iowa Press
ISBN: 9781587294761
Size: 15.27 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 51

There is some connexion (I like the way the English spell it They’re so clever about some things Probably smarter generally than we are Although there is supposed to be something We have that they don’'t—'don’t ask me What it is. . . .) —John Ashbery, “Tenth Symphony” Something We Have That They Don’t presents a variety of essays on the relationship between British and American poetry since 1925. The essays collected here all explore some aspect of the rich and complex history of Anglo-American poetic relations of the last seventy years. Since the dawn of Modernism poets either side of the Atlantic have frequently inspired each other’s developments, from Frost’s galvanizing advice to Edward Thomas to rearrange his prose as verse, to Eliot’s and Auden’s enormous influence on the poetry of their adopted nations (“whichever Auden is,” Eliot once replied when asked if he were a British or an American poet, “I suppose, I must be the other”); from the impact of Charles Olson and other Black Mountain poets on J. H. Prynne and the Cambridge School, to the widespread influence of Frank O'Hara and Robert Lowell on a diverse range of contemporary British poets. Clark and Ford’s study aims to chart some of the currents of these ever-shifting relations. Poets discussed in these essays include John Ashbery, W. H. Auden, Elizabeth Bishop, T. S. Eliot, Mark Ford, Robert Graves, Thom Gunn, Lee Harwood, Geoffrey Hill, Michael Hofmann, Susan Howe, Robert Lowell, and W. B. Yeats. “Poetry and sovereignty,” Philip Larkin remarked in an interview of 1982, “are very primitive things”: these essays consider the ways in which even seemingly very “unprimitive” poetries can be seen as reflecting and engaging with issues of national sovereignty and self-interest, and in the process they pose a series of fascinating questions about the national narratives that currently dominate definitions of the British and American poetic traditions. This innovative and exciting new collection will be of great interest to students and scholars of British and American poetry and comparative literature.

Poetic Acts New Media

Author: Tom O'Connor
Publisher: University Press of America
ISBN: 0761836306
Size: 14.78 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 18

Poetic Acts & New Media advances the fields of literary and new media studies by clarifying boundaries between competing genres and media through the creation of a new artistic genre, "media poetry." This aesthetic mode of expression/becoming seeks to transform mass culture (our codes of communication) by self-consciously acknowledging how textual, audio, and/or visual signs are constructed according to their simulation and not their representation. This study draws heavily upon literary media theories that intersect with Gilles Deleuze's philosophy of 'Sense' as a simulated power of sensory transformations. Media poetry becomes a complex power of 'Sense' by blending conventional mass-media codes with poetic simulations that provide alternative forms of creating meaning. Poetic Acts & New Media specifically examines the works of several poets that exemplify this multi-sensory approach to printed-text poetry, especially: .Langston Hughes .Tony Medina .David Wojahn .John Kinsella .David Trinidad. It also analyzes several contemporary films that embody the multi-modal logic of media poetry: .David Lynch's Mullholland Drive .Cameron Crowe's Vanilla Sky .Spike Jonze's Being John Malkovich. In addition, this study interprets two influential primetime TV shows as exemplars of media poetry: Twin Peaks and Buffy the Vampire Slayer. All media poetry, regardless of genre or medium, allows readers/viewers to envision "reality production" as a rewriteable and poetic enterprise that can productively remediate any transparent abstraction or common-sense realism."

Textual Relations

Author: Ramil Digal Gulle
Publisher: UP Press
ISBN: 9715425305
Size: 16.93 MB
Format: PDF
View: 56

Textual Relations is a poet's eroticization of reality through language. Sexy, fun, and irreverent, tragic and romantic, this book is a shrewd cocktail of pleasure and poetic truth.