Quiet Odyssey

Author: Mary Paik Lee
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 0295969695
Size: 10.10 MB
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Describes her life as a political refugee after the Russo-Japanese War, her family's move to California, and the conflict between their poverty and her vision of America

Women America And Movement

Author: Susan L. Roberson
Publisher: University of Missouri Press
ISBN: 0826211763
Size: 11.55 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Since the colonial days, American women have traveled, migrated, and relocated, always faced with the challenge of reconstructing their homes for themselves and their families. Women, America, and Movement offers a journey through largely unexplored territory--the experiences of migrating American women. These narratives, both real and imagined, represent a range of personal and critical perspectives; some of the women describe their travels as expansive and freeing, while others relate the dreadful costs and sacrifices of relocating. Despite the range of essays featured in this study, the writings all coalesce around the issues of politics, poetry, and self- identity described by Adrienne Rich as the elements of the "politics of location," treated here as the politics of relocation. The narratives featured in this book explore the impact of race, class, and sexual economics on migratory women, their self-identity, and their roles in family and social life. These issues demonstrate that in addition to geographic place, ideology is itself a space to be traversed. By examining the writings of such women as Louise Erdrich, Zora Neale Hurston, and Gertrude Stein, the essayists included in this volume offer a variety of experiences. The book confronts such issues as racist politicking against Native Americans, African Americans, and Asian immigrants; sexist attitudes that limit women to the roles of wife, mother, and sexual object; and exploitation of migrants from Appalachia and of women newly arrived in America. These essays also delve into the writings themselves by looking at what happens to narrative structure as authors or their characters cross geographic boundaries. The reader sees how women writers negotiate relocation in their texts and how the written word becomes a place where one finds oneself.

Too Good To Be True Nutrients Quiet The Unquiet Brain

Author: David Moyer
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 0971799016
Size: 16.16 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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This medical detective story describes the author's four generation family odyssey that leads him to paths less traveled. He discusses multiple biological triggers and leading edge interventions such as nutrients for those suffering from bipolar disorder and other central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Exploring the role of environmental factors such as infections, foods, and additives he challenges conventional wisdom, arguing for a closer look at a variety of contributing influences. Examples include Lyme disease, viruses, gluten, casein, MSG, and aspartame. He examines assumptions and practices in the justice and mental health systems that impact those with CNS disorders. This book describes some totally different ways - for patients, parents, teachers, therapists, police, prison guards, nurses, doctors and judges - to understand and respond to these crippling disorders.More than 70% of bipolar patients in one study were free of symptoms on a nutritional supplement alone without any medications. A simple two minute drugless "mania-buster" lasted for 24 hours. A psychotic patient was cured with antibiotics for Lyme disease. Too good to be true?

Asian American Autobiographers

Author: Guiyou Huang
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 031331408X
Size: 12.66 MB
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Asian Americans have made many significant contributions to industry, science, politics, and the arts. At the same time, they have made great sacrifices and endured enormous hardships. This reference examines autobiographies and memoirs written by Asian Americans in the 20th century. Included are alphabetically arranged entries on 60 major autobiographers of Asian descent. Each entry provides biographical information, a discussion of major autobiographical works and themes, a review of the writer's critical reception, and primary and secondary bibliographies. The volume begins with an introductory overview of Asian American autobiography and closes with a selected, general bibliography of critical studies.

The Making Of Asian America

Author: Erika Lee
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 9781476739410
Size: 17.34 MB
Format: PDF
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"The definitive history of Asian Americans by one of the nation's preeminent scholars on the subject. In the past fifty years, Asian Americans have helped change the face of America and are now the fastest growing group in the United States. But as award-winning historian Erika Lee reminds us, Asian Americans also have deep roots in the country. The Making of Asian America tells the little-known history of Asian Americans and their role in American life, from the arrival of the first Asians in the Americas to the present-day. An epic history of global journeys and new beginnings, this book shows how generations of Asian immigrants and their American-born descendants have made and remade Asian American life in the United States: sailors who came on the first trans-Pacific ships in the 1500s; indentured "coolies" who worked alongside African slaves in the Caribbean; and Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, Korean, and South Asian immigrants who were recruited to work in the United States only to face massive racial discrimination, Asian exclusion laws, and for Japanese Americans, incarceration during World War II. Over the past fifty years, a new Asian America has emerged out of community activism and the arrival of new immigrants and refugees. No longer a "despised minority," Asian Americans are now held up as America's "model minorities" in ways that reveal the complicated role that race still plays in the United States. Published to commemorate the fiftieth anniversary of the passage of the United States' Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 that has remade our "nation of immigrants," this is a new and definitive history of Asian Americans. But more than that, it is a new way of understanding America itself, its complicated histories of race and immigration, and its place in the world today"--