Roman Base Metal Coins

Author: Richard J. Plant
Publisher:
ISBN: 0948964480
Size: 20.14 MB
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A price guide of over 630 base metal Roman coins dated 241 BC - 498 AD, with their market values, notes on changes in the coinage over the years and over 640 drawings to aid identification.

Roman Coins From India

Author: Paula J Turner
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781315420684
Size: 10.37 MB
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This book is a detailed collation of the recorded finds of Roman coins on Indian soil, divided into Republican, Julio-Claudian and post-Julio-Claudian coins. It also includes chapters on the historical significance of the scarcity of Roman finds, the absence of base metal issues in the early empire, the predominance of early imperial denarii, and the difference in composition between the Julio-Claudian gold and silver hoards. There is considerable discussion on slashed gold coins and defaced silver coins and on imitation Roman coins found in India. Three exhaustive appendices include a catalogue of finds of Roman coins found in India, the present location of Roman coins found in India, and Roman coins in the Madras Central Government Museum. Copublished with the Royal Numismatic Society.

Imperial Ideals In The Roman West

Author: Carlos F. Noreña
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9781107005082
Size: 12.95 MB
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This book shows how the circulation of ideals associated with the Roman emperor generated ideological unification among aristocracies and reinforced Roman power.

Edinburgh Companion To Ancient Greece And Rome

Author: Edward Bispham
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
ISBN: 9780748627141
Size: 15.10 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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The Edinburgh Companion, newly available in paperback, is a gateway to the fascinating worlds of ancient Greece and Rome. Wide-ranging in its approach, it demonstrates the multifaceted nature of classical civilisation and enables readers to gain guidance in drawing together the perspectives and methods of different disciplines, from philosophy to history, from poetry to archaeology, from art history to numismatics, and many more.

A Companion To Roman Religion

Author: Jörg Rüpke
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9781444339246
Size: 19.87 MB
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A comprehensive treatment of the significant symbols and institutions of Roman religion, this companion places the various religious symbols, discourses, and practices, including Judaism and Christianity, into a larger framework to reveal the sprawling landscape of the Roman religion. An innovative introduction to Roman religion Approaches the field with a focus on the human-figures instead of the gods Analyzes religious changes from the eighth century BC to the fourth century AD Offers the first history of religious motifs on coins and household/everyday utensils Presents Roman religion within its cultural, social, and historical contexts

Rome And China

Author: Walter Scheidel
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199714290
Size: 18.86 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Transcending ethnic, linguistic, and religious boundaries, early empires shaped thousands of years of world history. Yet despite the global prominence of empire, individual cases are often studied in isolation. This series seeks to change the terms of the debate by promoting cross-cultural, comparative, and transdisciplinary perspectives on imperial state formation prior to the European colonial expansion. Two thousand years ago, up to one-half of the human species was contained within two political systems, the Roman empire in western Eurasia (centered on the Mediterranean Sea) and the Han empire in eastern Eurasia (centered on the great North China Plain). Both empires were broadly comparable in terms of size and population, and even largely coextensive in chronological terms (221 BCE to 220 CE for the Qin/Han empire, c. 200 BCE to 395 CE for the unified Roman empire). At the most basic level of resolution, the circumstances of their creation are not very different. In the East, the Shang and Western Zhou periods created a shared cultural framework for the Warring States, with the gradual consolidation of numerous small polities into a handful of large kingdoms which were finally united by the westernmost marcher state of Qin. In the Mediterranean, we can observe comparable political fragmentation and gradual expansion of a unifying civilization, Greek in this case, followed by the gradual formation of a handful of major warring states (the Hellenistic kingdoms in the east, Rome-Italy, Syracuse and Carthage in the west), and likewise eventual unification by the westernmost marcher state, the Roman-led Italian confederation. Subsequent destabilization occurred again in strikingly similar ways: both empires came to be divided into two halves, one that contained the original core but was more exposed to the main barbarian periphery (the west in the Roman case, the north in China), and a traditionalist half in the east (Rome) and south (China). These processes of initial convergence and subsequent divergence in Eurasian state formation have never been the object of systematic comparative analysis. This volume, which brings together experts in the history of the ancient Mediterranean and early China, makes a first step in this direction, by presenting a series of comparative case studies on clearly defined aspects of state formation in early eastern and western Eurasia, focusing on the process of initial developmental convergence. It includes a general introduction that makes the case for a comparative approach; a broad sketch of the character of state formation in western and eastern Eurasia during the final millennium of antiquity; and six thematically connected case studies of particularly salient aspects of this process.