Spatial Justice And Diaspora

Author: Sarah Keenan
Publisher:
ISBN: 1910761052
Size: 12.82 MB
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Spatial Justice and Diaspora brings the concept of spatial justice into conversation with empirical studies of racism and displacement, challenging and extending critical discussions of place, socio-spatiality, identities, and the juridico-political order. The volume brings together work exploring the conceptual and practical meaning of diaspora through a broad range of grounded studies, ranging from Palestinian street protest in Chile, to poetry written in Guantanamo Bay, to everyday practices of Ethiopian homemaking in Sweden. In so doing, it adds to theoretical explorations of spatial justice a keen attentiveness to lived experiences of the local, while also questioning any romanticized or essentialist reading of diaspora. Bringing to the fore innovative interdisciplinary scholarship, Spatial Justice and Diaspora offers a new critical intervention at the intersection of these fields.

Spacing In Diaspora

Author: Emma Patchett
Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG
ISBN: 9783110544251
Size: 11.82 MB
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This work attempts to counteract the essentialism of originary thinking in the contemporary era by providing a new reading of a relatively understudied corpus of literature from a ambivalently stereotyped diasporic group, in order to rethink and problematise the concept of diaspora as a spatial concept. As work situated in the Law-in-Literature movement, beyond the disciplinary boundaries of scholarship, this book aims to construct a ‘literary jurisprudence’ of diaspora space, deconstructing space in order to question what it means to be ‘settled’ in literary refractions of the lawscape by drawing on refractions of case law in a corpus of texts by Romani authors. These texts are used as hermeutic framings to draw unique spatio-temporal landscapes through which the reader can explore the refractive, reflective, interpretative conditions of legality as a crucible in which to theorise law.The radical intent of this work, therefore, is to deconstruct jurisprudential spatial order in order to theorize diaspora space, in the context of the Roma Diaspora. This work will offer readers new possibilities to re-imagine diaspora through law and literature and provides an innovative critical interdisciplinary analysis of the shaping of space.

Diaspora Law And Literature

Author: Klaus Stierstorfer
Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG
ISBN: 9783110489255
Size: 15.14 MB
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Diaspora Studies have emerged to study the changing patterns of global migration and home making. This volume offers new perspectives on this highly relevant field of research by integrating both legal and literary aspects, questions and methodologies in the study of diasporas and migration.

Spatial Justice

Author: Andreas Philippopoulos-Mihalopoulos
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781317702757
Size: 17.74 MB
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There can be no justice that is not spatial. Against a recent tendency to despatialise law, matter, bodies and even space itself, this book insists on spatialising them, arguing that there can be neither law nor justice that are not articulated through and in space. Spatial Justice presents a new theory and a radical application of the material connection between space – in the geographical as well as sociological and philosophical sense – and the law – in the broadest sense that includes written and oral law, but also embodied social and political norms. More specifically, it argues that spatial justice is the struggle of various bodies – human, natural, non-organic, technological – to occupy a certain space at a certain time. Seen in this way, spatial justice is the most radical offspring of the spatial turn, since, as this book demonstrates, spatial justice can be found in the core of most contemporary legal and political issues – issues such as geopolitical conflicts, environmental issues, animality, colonisation, droning, the cyberspace and so on. In order to ague this, the book employs the lawscape, as the tautology between law and space, and the concept of atmosphere in its geological, political, aesthetic, legal and biological dimension. Written by a leading theorist in the area, Spatial Justice: Body, Lawscape, Atmosphere forges a new interdisciplinary understanding of space and law, while offering a fresh approach to current geopolitical, spatiolegal and ecological issues.

Contemporary Indian Dance

Author: K. Katrak
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 9780230321809
Size: 10.12 MB
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Through discussion of a dazzling array of artists in India and the diaspora, this book delineates a new language of dance on the global stage. Myriad movement vocabularies intersect the dancers' creative landscape, while cutting-edge creative choreography parodies gender and cultural stereotypes, and represents social issues.

Encountering Difference

Author: Robin Cohen
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9781509508839
Size: 20.31 MB
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In the face of the destructive possibilities of resurgent nationalisms, unyielding ethnicities and fundamentalist religious affinities, there is hardly a more urgent task than understanding how humans can learn to live alongside one another. This fascinating book shows how people from various societies learn to live with social diversity and cultural difference, and considers how the concepts of identity formation, diaspora and creolization shed light on the processes and geographies of encounter. Robin Cohen and Olivia Sheringham reveal how early historical encounters created colonial hierarchies, but also how conflict has been creatively resisted through shared social practices in particular contact zones including islands, port cities and the ‘super-diverse’ cities formed by enhanced international migration and globalization. Drawing on research experience from across the world, including new fieldwork in Louisiana, Martinique, Mauritius and Cape Verde, their account provides a balance between rich description and insightful analysis showing, in particular, how identities emerge and merge ‘from below’. Moving seamlessly between social and political theory, history, cultural anthropology, sociology and human geography, the authors point to important new ways of understanding and living with difference, surely one of the key challenges of the twenty-first century.

Ireland And Migration In The Twenty First Century

Author: Mary Gilmartin
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9781784996574
Size: 18.58 MB
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Migration is one of the key issues in Ireland today. The economic crisis has led to a dramatic increase in levels of emigration from the country, and this follows a period of mass immigration during the Celtic Tiger era. This book provides a new and original approach to understanding contemporary Irish migration. It shows that immigration and emigration are processes that need to be understood together rather than separately, and uses a wide range of data - from statistical reports to in-depth qualitative studies - to show these connections. The book makes the links between different forms of migration explicit through a focus on four key themes - work, social connections, culture and belonging - that are common to the experiences of immigrants, emigrants and internal migrants. This includes a wide selection of case studies, such as the global GAA, the campaign for emigrant voting, medical migration and how families are changed by migration. Ireland and migration in the twenty first century is an invaluable resource for students and scholars of Irish migration. It also has broader relevance, as it suggests a new approach to the study of migration that addresses the concerns of leading scholars of migration.