The Footloose American

Author: Brian Kevin
Publisher: Broadway Books
ISBN: 9780770436384
Size: 15.17 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 40

An adventure-filled and thought-provoking travelogue along Hunter S. Thompson's forgotten route through South America In 1963, twenty-five-year-old Hunter S. Thompson completed a yearlong journey across South America, filing a series of dispatches for an upstart paper called the National Observer. It was here, on the front lines of the Cold War, that this then-unknown reporter began making a name for himself. The Hunter S. Thompson who would become America's iconic "gonzo journalist" was born in the streets of Rio, the mountains of Peru, and the black market outposts of Colombia. In The Footloose American, Brian Kevin traverses the continent with Thompson's ghost as his guide, offering a ground-level exploration of twenty-first-century South American culture, politics, and ecology. By contrasting the author's own thrilling, transformative experiences along the Hunter S. Thompson Trail with those that Thompson describes in his letters and lost Observer stories, The Footloose American is at once a gripping personal journey and a thought-provoking study of culture and place. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Frommer S Maine Coast

Author: Brian Kevin
Publisher: Complete Guide
ISBN: 1628873264
Size: 11.93 MB
Format: PDF
View: 51

You’ll never fall into tourist traps when you travel with Frommer's. Doing so is like having a trusted friend show you around, taking you to the places locals like best. That’s because our guidebooks, unlike much of the competition, are written by resident experts--like Brian Kevin, the author of Frommer’s Maine Coast, and the managing editor of Down East magazine. In this highly opinionated book, he’ll help you sort through the options so you can tailor a vacation that’s right for you. Frommer’s Maine Coast covers all of the region’s highlights--from the best beaches and lobster rolls to the most scenic places to hike, kayak, and sail. The book gives in-depth advice on how to tackle the wondrous Acadia National Park, the foodie scene in Portland, such small-town gems as York Village, Camden, Castine, and more. Our guide proudly contains: * Exact prices for every venue and activity listed, so there’s never any guessing or nasty surprises * Detailed maps throughout, plus a handy pullout map * Savvy, hard-hitting reviews of restaurants, hotels, attractions, shopping, and nightlife in all price ranges, from luxe to backpacker-friendly * Helpful suggested itineraries so you can make the most of your vacation time

Congo Journey

Author: Redmond O'Hanlon
Publisher: Penguin UK
ISBN: 9780141933436
Size: 13.78 MB
Format: PDF
View: 86

Combining the acute observation of a nineteenth-century missionary, and the wit of a Monty Python player, Redmond O'Hanlon is famous for his adventurous travel. His new challenge is the Congo, the most dangerous and inhospitable jungle in the world.

Hunter S Thompson

Author: Kevin T. McEneaney
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9781442266216
Size: 17.11 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 76

A decade after Hunter S. Thompson’s death, his books—including Hell’s Angels, The Curse of Lono, The Great Shark Hunt, and Rum Diary—continue to sell thousands of copies each year, and previously unpublished manuscripts of his still surface for publication. While Thompson never claimed to be a great writer, he did invent a new literary style—“gonzo”—that has been widely influential on both literature and journalism. Though Thompson and his work engendered a significant—even rabid—following, relatively little analysis has been published about his writing. In Hunter S. Thompson: Fear, Loathing, and the Birth of Gonzo, Kevin T. McEneaney examines the intellectual background of this American original, providing biographical details and placing Thompson within a larger social and historical context. A significant portion of this book is devoted to the creation, reception, and legacy of his most important works, particularly Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas. In addition to discussing influences on Thompson's work—including Homer, Nietzsche, Spengler, Melville, Twain, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Kerouac, and others—as well as the writers Thompson influenced, McEneaney also explains the literary origins of gonzo. With new biographical information about Thompson and an examination of his writing techniques, this book provides readers with a better understanding of the journalist and novelist. A look beyond the larger-than-life public persona, Hunter S. Thompson: Fear, Loathing, and the Birth of Gonzo will be of great interest to fans of Thompson’s work as well as to those wanting to know more about gonzo journalism and literature.

The Sidewalk Smokers Club

Author: Stephen Siciliano
Publisher: iUniverse
ISBN: 9780595395811
Size: 11.87 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 91

Stephen Siciliano's Sidewalk Smokers are driven outdoors by the most selective kind of lawmaking, engaged in resisting the overregulation of American life, a cabal of rootless cosmopolitans on the make for the big break. The Smokers unite behind one of their own, taking on a media giant over the publication of some nude photos. Lethargic sensualists, craven in their drive for publicity, the group's saving grace is that they are uncommonly kind to one another. Do we really know people like this? Probably not, which may in the end be what Mr. Siciliano is after. "Like brilliance on caffeine 'Smokers' radiates in all directions and dimensions yet returns to its zero point as surely as the swallows return to Capitstrano."-The Espresso, San Diego "It's clearly the book of the year."-Highwayscribery blog

Stories I Tell Myself

Author: Juan F. Thompson
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 9781101875865
Size: 17.73 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 81

Hunter S. Thompson, “smart hillbilly,” boy of the South, born and bred in Louisville, Kentucky, son of an insurance salesman and a stay-at-home mom, public school-educated, jailed at seventeen on a bogus petty robbery charge, member of the U.S. Air Force (Airmen Second Class), copy boy for Time, writer for The National Observer, et cetera. From the outset he was the Wild Man of American journalism with a journalistic appetite that touched on subjects that drove his sense of justice and intrigue, from biker gangs and 1960s counterculture to presidential campaigns and psychedelic drugs. He lived larger than life and pulled it up around him in a mad effort to make it as electric, anger-ridden, and drug-fueled as possible. Now Juan Thompson tells the story of his father and of their getting to know each other during their forty-one fraught years together. He writes of the many dark times, of how far they ricocheted away from each other, and of how they found their way back before it was too late. He writes of growing up in an old farmhouse in a narrow mountain valley outside of Aspen—Woody Creek, Colorado, a ranching community with Hereford cattle and clover fields . . . of the presence of guns in the house, the boxes of ammo on the kitchen shelves behind the glass doors of the country cabinets, where others might have placed china and knickknacks . . . of climbing on the back of Hunter’s Bultaco Matador trail motorcycle as a young boy, and father and son roaring up the dirt road, trailing a cloud of dust . . . of being taken to bars in town as a small boy, Hunter holding court while Juan crawled around under the bar stools, picking up change and taking his found loot to Carl’s Pharmacy to buy Archie comic books . . . of going with his parents as a baby to a Ken Kesey/Hells Angels party with dozens of people wandering around the forest in various stages of undress, stoned on pot, tripping on LSD . . . He writes of his growing fear of his father; of the arguments between his parents reaching frightening levels; and of his finally fighting back, trying to protect his mother as the state troopers are called in to separate father and son. And of the inevitable—of mother and son driving west in their Datsun to make a new home, a new life, away from Hunter; of Juan’s first taste of what “normal” could feel like . . . We see Juan going to Concord Academy, a stranger in a strange land, coming from a school that was a log cabin in the middle of hay fields, Juan without manners or socialization . . . going on to college at Tufts; spending a crucial week with his father; Hunter asking for Juan’s opinion of his writing; and he writes of their dirt biking on a hilltop overlooking Woody Creek Valley, acting as if all the horrible things that had happened between them had never taken place, and of being there, together, side by side . . . And finally, movingly, he writes of their long, slow pull toward reconciliation . . . of Juan’s marriage and the birth of his own son; of watching Hunter love his grandson and Juan’s coming to understand how Hunter loved him; of Hunter’s growing illness, and Juan’s becoming both son and father to his father . . . From the Hardcover edition.

The Proud Highway

Author: Hunter S. Thompson
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 9781408861943
Size: 15.65 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 31

The Proud Highway is a literary milestone. The first volume in Hunter S. Thompson's intimate letters begins with a high school essay written in 1955, and takes us through 1967, when the publication of Hell's Angels made the author an international celebrity. Thompson's prolific and often profound correspondence gives us an unforgettable insight into the world during the Cold War era, as well as an authoritative introduction to the cultural revolution of the sixties. With a vicious eye for detail and rude wit he writes to such luminaries as Norman Mailer, Tom Wolfe, Lyndon Johnson and Joan Baez. These letters represent the evolution of the original, a singular voice defying an era of banality, and cements Thompson's reputation as one of the great romantic journalistic figures of our time.