The Opening Of American Law

Author: Herbert Hovenkamp
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199331314
Size: 12.49 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Two Victorian Era intellectual movements changed the course of American legal thought: Darwinian natural selection and marginalist economics. The two movements rested on fundamentally inconsistent premises. Darwinism emphasized instinct, random selection, and determinism; marginalism emphasized rational choice. American legal theory managed to accommodate both, although to different degrees in different disciplines. The two movements also developed mutually exclusive scientific methodologies. Darwinism emphasizing external indicators of welfare such as productivity, education or health, while marginalists emphasized market choice. Historians have generally exaggerated the role of Darwinism in American legal thought, while understating the role of marginalist economics. This book explores these issues in several legal disciplines and time periods, including Progressive Era redistributive policies, American common law, public law, and laws regarding corporations and competition. One is Progressive Era movements for redistributive policies about taxation and public goods. Darwinian science also dominated the law of race relations, while criminal law reflected an inconsistent mixture of Darwinian and marginalist incentive-based theories. The common law, including family law, contract, property, and tort, moved from emphasis on correction of past harms to management of ongoing risk and relationship. A chapter on Legal Realism emphasizes the Realists' indebtedness to institutional economics, a movement that powerfully influenced American legal theory long after it fell out of favor with economists. Five chapters on the corporation, innovation and competition policy show how marginalist economics transformed business policy. The ironic exception was patent law, which developed in relative insulation from economic concerns about innovation policy. The book concludes with three chapters on public law, emphasizing the role of institutionalist economics in policy making during and after the New Deal. A lengthy epilogue then explores the variety of postwar attempts to reconstruct a defensible and more market-oriented rule of law after the decline of Legal Realism and the New Deal.

Enterprise And American Law 1836 1937

Author: Herbert Hovenkamp
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674038835
Size: 20.55 MB
Format: PDF
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In this integration of law and economic ideas, Herbert Hovenkamp charts the evolution of the legal framework that regulated American business enterprise from the time of Andrew Jackson through the first New Deal. He reveals the interdependent relationship between economic theory and law that existed in these decades of headlong growth and examines how this relationship shaped both the modern business corporation and substantive due process. Classical economic theory--the cluster of ideas about free markets--became the guiding model for the structure and function of both private and public law. Hovenkamp explores the relationship of classical economic ideas to law in six broad areas related to enterprise in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. He traces the development of the early business corporation and maps the rise of regulated industry from the first charterbased utilities to the railroads. He argues that free market political economy provided the intellectual background for constitutional theory and helped define the limits of state and federal regulation of business behavior. The book also illustrates the unique American perspective on political economy reflected in the famous doctrine of substantive due process. Finally, Hovenkamp demonstrates the influence of economic theory on labor law and gives us a reexamination of the antitrust movement, the most explicit intersection of law and economics before the New Deal. Legal, economic, and intellectual historians and political scientists will welcome these trenchant insights on an influential period in American constitutional and corporate history.

English Legal System Concentrate

Author: Tim Vollans
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199587773
Size: 20.90 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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English Legal System Concentrate is a high quality revision guide which covers the main topics found on undergraduate and GDL courses. The clear, succinct coverage of key legal points within a specific topic area, including key cases, enables students to quickly grasp the fundamental principles of this area of law. The book focuses on the needs of students to succeed in their exams, showing how all the legal rules fit together and the approach that should be adopted when answering questions. A range of pedagogical features help with preparation for exams and suggest numerous ways to improve marks. English Legal System Concentrate provides succinct coverage of all key elements of the law, while also offering students further avenues of investigation, presenting key academic debates and other analytical features. OUP's Concentrate revision series is endorsed by students and lecturers for level of coverage, accuracy, and exam advice. Online Resource Centre English Legal System Concentrate is accompanied by a free, open-access Online Resource Centre (http://www.oxfordtextbooks.co.uk/orc/vollans_concentrate2e) which offers the following resources to support students: - Multiple choice questions which provide instant feedback - Interactive flashcards of key cases (the student is presented with a case and has to supply the principle, or vice versa) - Interactive version of glossary - Updates to case law and legislation - Further reading - Web links to key online sources - Advice on revision and exam technique authored by renowned textbook writer and experienced examiner Nigel Foster, Professor of Law and Deputy Vice-Chancellor of the University of Buckingham.

Illiberal Reformers

Author: Thomas C. Leonard
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9781400874071
Size: 19.49 MB
Format: PDF
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In Illiberal Reformers, Thomas Leonard reexamines the economic progressives whose ideas and reform agenda underwrote the Progressive Era dismantling of laissez-faire and the creation of the regulatory welfare state, which, they believed, would humanize and rationalize industrial capitalism. But not for all. Academic social scientists such as Richard T. Ely, John R. Commons, and Edward A. Ross, together with their reform allies in social work, charity, journalism, and law, played a pivotal role in establishing minimum-wage and maximum-hours laws, workmen's compensation, antitrust regulation, and other hallmarks of the regulatory welfare state. But even as they offered uplift to some, economic progressives advocated exclusion for others, and did both in the name of progress. Leonard meticulously reconstructs the influence of Darwinism, racial science, and eugenics on scholars and activists of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, revealing a reform community deeply ambivalent about America's poor. Illiberal Reformers shows that the intellectual champions of the regulatory welfare state proposed using it not to help those they portrayed as hereditary inferiors but to exclude them.

American Amnesia

Author: Jacob S. Hacker
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 9781451667837
Size: 16.41 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 87

"A spirited examination of why what's good for American business elites and what's good for Americans have become misaligned"--Front jacket flap.