The Warmth Of Other Suns

Author: Isabel Wilkerson
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 9780679604075
Size: 12.23 MB
Format: PDF
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One of The New York Times Book Review’s 10 Best Books of the Year In this epic, beautifully written masterwork, Pulitzer Prize–winning author Isabel Wilkerson chronicles one of the great untold stories of American history: the decades-long migration of black citizens who fled the South for northern and western cities, in search of a better life. From 1915 to 1970, this exodus of almost six million people changed the face of America. Wilkerson compares this epic migration to the migrations of other peoples in history. She interviewed more than a thousand people, and gained access to new data and official records, to write this definitive and vividly dramatic account of how these American journeys unfolded, altering our cities, our country, and ourselves. With stunning historical detail, Wilkerson tells this story through the lives of three unique individuals: Ida Mae Gladney, who in 1937 left sharecropping and prejudice in Mississippi for Chicago, where she achieved quiet blue-collar success and, in old age, voted for Barack Obama when he ran for an Illinois Senate seat; sharp and quick-tempered George Starling, who in 1945 fled Florida for Harlem, where he endangered his job fighting for civil rights, saw his family fall, and finally found peace in God; and Robert Foster, who left Louisiana in 1953 to pursue a medical career, the personal physician to Ray Charles as part of a glitteringly successful medical career, which allowed him to purchase a grand home where he often threw exuberant parties. Wilkerson brilliantly captures their first treacherous and exhausting cross-country trips by car and train and their new lives in colonies that grew into ghettos, as well as how they changed these cities with southern food, faith, and culture and improved them with discipline, drive, and hard work. Both a riveting microcosm and a major assessment, The Warmth of Other Suns is a bold, remarkable, and riveting work, a superb account of an “unrecognized immigration” within our own land. Through the breadth of its narrative, the beauty of the writing, the depth of its research, and the fullness of the people and lives portrayed herein, this book is destined to become a classic. From the Hardcover edition.

The Warmth Of Other Suns

Author: Isabel Wilkerson
Publisher: Random House Digital, Inc.
ISBN: 9780679763888
Size: 13.95 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 80

Presents an epic history that covers the period from the end of World War I through the 1970s, chronicling the decades-long migration of African Americans from the South to the North and West through the stories of three individuals and their families.

The Warmth Of Other Suns

Author: Isabel Wilkerson
Publisher: Random House Incorporated
ISBN: 9780679444329
Size: 17.81 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 95

An epic history covering the period from the end of World War I through the 1970s chronicles the decades-long migration of African Americans from the South to the North and West through the stories of three individuals and their families.

Quicklet On Isabel Wilkerson S The Warmth Of Other Suns The Epic Story Of America S Great Migration

Author: Taryn Nakamura
Publisher: Hyperink Inc
ISBN: 9781614641544
Size: 13.15 MB
Format: PDF
View: 82

ABOUT THE BOOK Isabel Wilkerson's "The Warmth of Other Suns" is truly a labor of love. It took 15 years to research and write, as she interviewed over 1,200 people. Wilkerson tracked down her subjects at churches, quilting clubs, funerals, family reunions, and others. After preliminary rounds of interviews, she narrowed her search down to 30 people, and then chose the three main subjects who appear in the book. She was racing against the clock to collect as many stories as possible from the migrants, whose numbers were starting to dwindle. Her book even covers the funerals of both George Starling and Robert Pershing Foster. In order to write her story in a heartfelt manner, Wilkerson recreated Robert Foster's exhausting drive from Louisiana to California. Dr. Foster drove through three states without rest because blacks werent welcome at any motels in those regions. Wilkerson's trip was cut short by her parents, who insisted she stop before reaching dangerous levels of fatigue. At a particularly perilous tract of the drive, Wilkerson writes that her mother said, "You know he must have been ready to cry right about here." MEET THE AUTHOR Taryn was born and raised in Hawaii. She recently returned home after receiving a B.A. in English at Yale University. As a writing concentrator at Yale, Taryn focused on fiction, but as a Hyperink writer, she has learned that nonfiction can also be fun. In her free time, she likes to run at walking pace, haunt libraries, and eat pickles. EXCERPT FROM THE BOOK Critics have put Isabel Wilkerson's book on par with classics like "Roots" and "The Grapes of Wrath". The Wall Street Journal writes, "Ms. Wilkerson does for the Great Migration what John Steinback did for the Okies in his fiction masterpiece, The Grapes of Wrath; she humanizes history, giving it emotional and psychological depth." (The Great Northern Migration) But Ms. Wilkerson's piece deserves a category of its own. Her book goes beyond both traditional and oral history. She avoided the style of Studs Terkel, opting for a more cohesive narrative. (A Writer's Long Journey to Trace the Great Migration) Critics agree that Isabel Wilkerson's book is both beautifully written and thoroughly researched. Articles in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and The New Yorker can attest to that. The book's appearance on Best Book of the Year lists -- L.A. Times, The Washington Post, The New Yorker, The Economist, and more -- reflects the high quality of reporting. Yet the critics diverge in their assessment of the ending of the book and our takeaway. As Kevin Boyle writes in his Chicago Tribune review, "In the end, though, Wilkerson herself seems to blink, arguing that, despite the struggles she so beautifully describes, the Great Migration was nothing less than the fulfillment of the American Dream as the migrants themselves defined it." TABLE OF CONTENTS - About the Book - A Southerner Once Removed - Overall Summary of The Warmth of Other Suns - The South, 1915 to the 1970s - Key Words and Historical Figures - Major Characters - Strangers in a Strange Land: Migrant Hierarchy - What the Critics are Saying - The Other Voices - Interesting Facts - Sources and Additional Reading

The Promised Land

Author: Nicholas Lemann
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 9780307764874
Size: 16.49 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 57

A New York Times bestseller, the groundbreaking authoritative history of the migration of African-Americans from the rural South to the urban North. A definitive book on American history, The Promised Land is also essential reading for educators and policymakers at both national and local levels. From the Trade Paperback edition.

The Twelve Tribes Of Hattie

Author: Ayana Mathis
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 9781448134397
Size: 14.13 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 80

Fifteen years old and blazing with the hope of a better life, Hattie Shepherd fled the horror of the American South on a dawn train bound for Philadelphia. Hattie’s is a tale of strength, of resilience and heartbreak that spans six decades. Her American dream is shattered time and again: a husband who lies and cheats and nine children raised in a cramped little house that was only ever supposed to be temporary. She keeps the children alive with sheer will and not an ounce of the affection they crave. She knows they don’t think her a kind woman — but how could they understand that all the love she had was used up in feeding them and clothing them. How do you prepare your children for a world you know is cruel? The lives of this unforgettable family form a searing portrait of twentieth century America. From the revivalist tents of Alabama to Vietnam, to the black middle-class enclave in the heart of the city, to a filthy bar in the ghetto, The Twelve Tribes of Hattie is an extraordinary, distinctive novel about the guilt, sacrifice, responsibility and heartbreak that are an intrinsic part of ferocious love.

The Making Of A Racist

Author: Charles B. Dew
Publisher: University of Virginia Press
ISBN: 9780813938882
Size: 19.43 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 71

In this powerful memoir, Charles Dew, one of America’s most respected historians of the South--and particularly its history of slavery--turns the focus on his own life, which began not in the halls of enlightenment but in a society unequivocally committed to segregation. Dew re-creates the midcentury American South of his childhood--in many respects a boy’s paradise, but one stained by Lost Cause revisionism and, worse, by the full brunt of Jim Crow. Through entertainments and "educational" books that belittled African Americans, as well as the living examples of his own family, Dew was indoctrinated in a white supremacy that, at best, was condescendingly paternalistic and, at worst, brutally intolerant. The fear that southern culture, and the "hallowed white male brotherhood," could come undone through the slightest flexibility in the color line gave the Jim Crow mindset its distinctly unyielding quality. Dew recalls his father, in most regards a decent man, becoming livid over a black tradesman daring to use the front, and not the back, door. The second half of the book shows how this former Confederate youth and descendant of Thomas Roderick Dew, one of slavery’s most passionate apologists, went on to reject his racist upbringing and become a scholar of the South and its deeply conflicted history. The centerpiece of Dew’s story is his sobering discovery of a price circular from 1860--an itemized list of humans up for sale. Contemplating this document becomes Dew’s first step in an exploration of antebellum Richmond’s slave trade that investigates the terrible--but, to its white participants, unremarkable--inhumanity inherent in the institution. Dew’s wish with this book is to show how the South of his childhood came into being, poisoning the minds even of honorable people, and to answer the question put to him by Illinois Browning Culver, the African American woman who devoted decades of her life to serving his family: "Charles, why do the grown-ups put so much hate in the children?"