U S Central Americans

Author: Karina Oliva Alvarado
Publisher: University of Arizona Press
ISBN: 9780816534067
Size: 17.17 MB
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This interdisciplinary edited volume of thirteen essays presents a broad look at the Central American experience in the United States with a focus on Southern California. By examining oral histories, art, poetry, and community formation, the contributors fill a void in the scholarship on the multiple histories, experiences, and forms of resistance of Central American groups in the United States. The contributors provide new research on the 1.5 generation and beyond and how the transnational dynamics manifest in California, home to one of the largest U.S. Central American populations.

Taking Their Word

Author: Arturo Arias
Publisher: U of Minnesota Press
ISBN: 9781452913162
Size: 13.81 MB
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Central Americans are one of the largest Latino population groups in the United States. Yet, Arturo Arias argues, the cultural production of Central Americans remains little known to North Americans. In Taking Their Word, Arias complicates notions of the cultural production of Central America, from Mexico in the North to Panama in the South. He charts the literature of Central America’s liberation struggles of the 1970s and 1980s, its transformation after peace treaties were signed, the emergence of a new Maya literature that decenters Latin American literature written in Spanish, and the rise and fall of testimonio. Arias demonstrates that Central America and its literature are marked by an indigenousness that has never before been fully theorized or critically grasped. Never one to avoid controversy, Arias proffers his views of how the immigration of Central Americans to North America has changed the cultural topography of both zones. With this groundbreaking work, Arias establishes the importance of Central American literature and provides a frame for future studies of the region’s culture. Arturo Arias is director of Latin American studies at the University of Redlands. He is the author of six novels in Spanish and editor of The Rigoberta Mench Controversy (Minnesota, 2001).

Fragmented Ties

Author: Cecilia Menjívar
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520924371
Size: 13.84 MB
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In one of the most comprehensive treatments of Salvadoran immigration to date, Cecilia Menjívar gives a vivid and detailed account of the inner workings of the networks by which immigrants leave their homes in Central America to start new lives in the Mission District of San Francisco. Menjívar traces crucial aspects of the immigrant experience, from reasons for leaving El Salvador, to the long and perilous journey through Mexico, to the difficulty of finding work, housing, and daily necessities in San Francisco. Fragmented Ties argues that hostile immigration policies, shrinking economic opportunities, and a resource-poor community make assistance conditional and uneven, deflating expectations both on the part of the new immigrants and the relatives who preceded them. In contrast to most studies of immigrant life that identify networks as viable sources of assistance, this one focuses on a case in which poverty makes it difficult for immigrants to accumulate enough resources to help each other. Menjívar also examines how class, gender, and age affect immigrants' access to social networks and scarce community resources. The immigrants' voices are stirring and distinctive: they describe the dangers they face both during the journey and once they arrive, and bring to life the disappointments and joys that they experience in their daily struggle to survive in their adopted community.

Seeking Community In A Global City

Author: Nora Hamilton
Publisher: Temple University Press
ISBN: 1566398681
Size: 15.24 MB
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Driven by the pressures of poverty and civil strife at home, large numbers of Central Americans came to the Los Angeles area during the 1980s. Neither purely economic migrants, though they were in search of stable work, nor official refugees, although they carried the scars of war and persecution, Guatemalans and Salvadorans were even denied the aid given to refugees such as Cubans and Vietnamese. In addition, these immigrants sought refuge in a city undergoing massive economic and demographic shifts of its own. The result was—and is—a complex interaction that will help to reconceptualize the migration experience. Based on twenty years of work with the Los Angeles Central American community and filled with facts, figures, and personal narratives,Seeking Community in a Global Citypresents this saga from many perspectives. The authors examine the forces in Central America that sent thousands of people streaming across international borders. They discuss economic, political, and demographic changes in the Los Angeles region and the difficulties the new immigrants faced in negotiating a new, urban environment. They look at family roles, networking, work strategies, and inter-ethnic relations. But they also consider policy issues and alliances, changing expectations, shifting priorities, and the reciprocal effect of the migrants and the city on each other. Author note:Nora Hamiltonis Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Southern California.Norma Stoltz Chinchillais Professor of Sociology and Women's Studies at California State University, Long Beach.

The Cha Cha Files

Author: Maya Chinchilla
Publisher:
ISBN: 0988967383
Size: 10.47 MB
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The Cha Cha Files: A Chapina Poética by Maya Chinchilla is a timely debut that makes visible the Central American-Guatemalan diaspora and disentangles the myths from the mayhem of civil wars, urban wars, and the wars raging in young hearts. Part memory, part imaginary, The Cha Cha Files honors Central American feministas, Long Beach roqueras, families divided by war, lovers separated by borders, and celebrates the pleasure and heartbreak of femmes, machas, y mariconadas. These poems, stories, and snapshots traverse California coastlines and southern borderlines, cut across tense multi-culti high-school hallways, sing Solidarity Movement songs, mosh through tribal slam pits, and find home in the vibrant Bay Area where radical activists and lovers alike come of age. Chinchilla's hopeful and uniquely Chapina voice emerges as a significant contribution to U.S. Latina/o literary works.

Immigrant Families

Author: Cecilia Menj?var
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9780745696744
Size: 15.51 MB
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Immigrant Families aims to capture the richness, complexity, and diversity that characterize contemporary immigrant families in the United States. In doing so, it reaffirms that the vast majority of people do not migrate as isolated individuals, but are members of families. There is no quintessential immigrant experience, as immigrants and their families arrive with different levels of economic, social, and cultural resources, and must navigate various social structures that shape how they fare. Immigrant Families highlights the hierarchies and inequities between and within immigrant families created by key axes of inequality such as legal status, social class, gender, and generation. Drawing on ethnographic, demographic, and historical scholarship, the authors highlight the transnational context in which many contemporary immigrant families live, exploring how families navigate care, resources, expectations, and aspirations across borders. Ultimately, the book analyzes how dynamics at the individual, family, and community levels shape the life chances and wellbeing of immigrants and their families. As the United States turns its attention to immigration as a critical social issue, Immigrant Families encourages students, scholars, and policy makers to center family in their discussions, thereby prioritizing the human and relational element of human mobility.

The Wandering Song

Author: Hector Tobar
Publisher: Tia Chucha
ISBN: 1882688538
Size: 12.53 MB
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Tia Chucha Press is proud to present an anthology of Central American writers living in the United States. It features work that captures the complexity of a rapidly growing community that shares certain experiences with other Latino groups, but also offers its own unique narrative. This is the first-ever comprehensive literary survey of the Central American diaspora by a U.S. publisher, perfect for high school, college, or university courses in U.S. literature, Latino literature, multicultural studies, and migration studies. A multi-genre collection--including poems, short stories, essays, memoir or novel excerpts, and creative nonfiction--the book showcases writers who render a multiplicity of experiences, as refugees from the wars of the 1980s to those who barely remember the homeland or who were born in el norte. There are writers from both coasts and from the middle. Their aesthetics range from hip-hop inflected to high literary to acrobatics in Spanglish. Yet it is a community that shares a history of violence--both here and back home--and the hope and healing that ensures its survival. They include migrants or children of migrants from countries in the so-called Northern Triangle--El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras--considered one of the most violent places on earth, as well as from Belize, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, and Panam�.