Visualizing The Sacred

Author: George E. Lankford
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 9780292768086
Size: 11.99 MB
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The prehistoric native peoples of the Mississippi River Valley and other areas of the Eastern Woodlands of the United States shared a complex set of symbols and motifs that constituted one of the greatest artistic traditions of the pre-Columbian Americas. Traditionally known as the Southeastern Ceremonial Complex, these artifacts of copper, shell, stone, clay, and wood were the subject of the groundbreaking 2007 book Ancient Objects and Sacred Realms: Interpretations of Mississippian Iconography, which presented a major reconstruction of the rituals, cosmology, ideology, and political structures of the Mississippian peoples. Visualizing the Sacred advances the study of Mississippian iconography by delving into the regional variations within what is now known as the Mississippian Iconographic Interaction Sphere (MIIS). Bringing archaeological, ethnographic, ethnohistoric, and iconographic perspectives to the analysis of Mississippian art, contributors from several disciplines discuss variations in symbols and motifs among major sites and regions across a wide span of time and also consider what visual symbols reveal about elite status in diverse political environments. These findings represent the first formal identification of style regions within the Mississippian Iconographic Interaction Sphere and call for a new understanding of the MIIS as a network of localized, yet interrelated religious systems that experienced both continuity and change over time.

Hero Hawk And Open Hand

Author: Richard F. Townsend
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300106015
Size: 18.18 MB
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Along the Ohio, Tennessee, and Mississippi Rivers, the archaeological remains of earthen pyramids, plazas, large communities, and works of art and artifacts testify to Native American civilizations that thrived there between 3000 B.C. and A.D. 1500. This fascinating book presents exciting new information on the art and cultures of these ancient peoples and features hundreds of gorgeous photographs of important artworks, artifacts, and ritual objects excavated from Amerindian archaeological sites. Drawing on excavation findings and extensive research, the contributors to the book document a succession of distinct ancient populations in the pre-Columbian world of the American Midwest and Southeast. A team of interdisciplinary scholars examines the connections between archaeological remains of different regions and the themes, forms, and rituals that continue in specific tribes of today. The book also includes the personal reflections of contemporary Native Americans who discuss their perspectives on the significance of the fascinating and beautiful prehistoric artifacts as well as their own cultural practices today.

Sun Circles And Human Hands

Author: Emma Lila Fundaburk
Publisher: University of Alabama Press
ISBN: 9780817310776
Size: 15.73 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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From utilitarian arrowheads to beautiful stone effigy pipes to ornately-carved shell disks, the photographs and drawings in Sun Circles and Human Hands present the archaeological record of the art and native crafts of the prehistoric southeastern Indians, painstakingly compiled in the 1950s by two sisters who traveled the eastern United States interviewing archaeologists and collectors and visiting the major repositories. Although research over the last 50 years has disproven many of the early theories reported in the text—which were not the editors' theories but those of the archaeologists of the day—the excellent illustrations of objects no longer available for examination have more than validated the lasting worth of this popular book.

Ancient Objects And Sacred Realms

Author: F. Kent Reilly, III
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 0292774400
Size: 15.69 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Between AD 900-1600, the native peoples of the Mississippi River Valley and other areas of the Eastern Woodlands of the United States conceived and executed one of the greatest artistic traditions of the Precolumbian Americas. Created in the media of copper, shell, stone, clay, and wood, and incised or carved with a complex set of symbols and motifs, this seven-hundred-year-old artistic tradition functioned within a multiethnic landscape centered on communities dominated by earthen mounds and plazas. Previous researchers have referred to this material as the Southeastern Ceremonial Complex (SECC). This groundbreaking volume brings together ten essays by leading anthropologists, archaeologists, and art historians, who analyze the iconography of Mississippian art in order to reconstruct the ritual activities, cosmological vision, and ideology of these ancient precursors to several groups of contemporary Native Americans. Significantly, the authors correlate archaeological, ethnographic, and art historical data that illustrate the stylistic differences within Mississippian art as well as the numerous changes that occur through time. The research also demonstrates the inadequacy of the SECC label, since Mississippian art is not limited to the Southeast and reflects stylistic changes over time among several linked but distinct religious traditions. The term Mississippian Iconographic Interaction Sphere (MIIS) more adequately describes the corpus of this Mississippian art. Most important, the authors illustrate the overarching nature of the ancient Native American religious system, as a creation unique to the native American cultures of the eastern United States.

Rethinking Moundville And Its Hinterland

Author: Vincas P. Steponaitis
Publisher:
ISBN: 0813061660
Size: 11.19 MB
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"A substantive addition to our knowledge about one of the premier archaeological sites in eastern North America."--George Milner, author of The Cahokia Chiefdom Moundville, near Tuscaloosa, Alabama, is one of the largest pre-Columbian mound sites in North America. Comprising twenty-nine earthen mounds that were once platforms for chiefly residences and temples, Moundville was a major political and religious center for the people living in its region and for the wider Mississippian world. A much-needed synthesis of the rapidly expanding archaeological work that has taken place in the region over the past two decades, this volume presents the results of multifaceted research and new excavations. Using models deeply rooted in local ethnohistory, it ties Moundville and its people more closely than before to the ethnography of native southerners and emphasizes the role of social memory and ritual practices both at the mound center and in the hinterland, providing an up-to-date and refreshingly nuanced interpretation of Mississippian culture.

A Companion To Dental Anthropology

Author: Joel D. Irish
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9781118845516
Size: 20.83 MB
Format: PDF
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Companion to Dental Anthropology presents a collection of original readings addressing all aspects and sub-disciplines of the field of dental anthropology—from its origins and evolution through to the latest scientific research. Represents the most comprehensive coverage of all sub-disciplines of dental anthropology available today Features individual chapters written by experts in their specific area of dental research Includes authors who also present results from their research through case studies or voiced opinions about their work Offers extensive coverage of topics relating to dental evolution, morphometric variation, and pathology

Recreating Hopewell

Author: Douglas K. Charles
Publisher:
ISBN: 0813028981
Size: 11.92 MB
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Two thousand years ago, the Hopewell culture dominated much of eastern North America and left behind earthworks and other artifacts that continue to fascinate archaeologists. Recreating Hopewell--the first comprehensive overview of Hopewell archaeology published in a generation--represents more than two decades of new research into the vast world of the moundbuilders. This book includes contributions from scholars working at sites in the Hopewell "core" region of Ohio as well as archaeologists based in Michigan, Wisconsin, Illinois, Missouri, Tennessee, and Georgia. Their results are based on cultural resource management excavations and new analytical techniques, such as the remote sensing of unexcavated sites and chemical sourcing of raw materials. While providing new insights from each Hopewell region's lithic, ceramic, faunal, and botanical data, this new research clearly shows the extent to which the Hopewell cultures differed across the midcontinent. Giving Hopewell a broader context than previously understood, the authors tie prehistory to historic Indian activities, beliefs, and customs. Scholars interested in the archaeology of eastern North America, especially those working on the juncture of ceremony and settlement, will welcome this important volume.